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: ATE's Vision, Mission and Goals (incorporating Strategic Plan)
: Board of Directors
: Association Development Specialists
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: Delegate Assembly
: ATE Position Framework
: Past Presidents
: 2017 Election Results
: Resolutions of the Association of Teacher Educators, 2004-2009
: ATE Resolutions 2010-2013
: ATE Resolutions, 2014 forward
: 2018 Election Nominations Sought

Position Framework: Association of Teacher Educators (ATE)
 
Purpose of the ATE Position Framework
 
ATE leadership is strengthened by an association platform statement of policies and beliefs from which to view issues, speak out, and enact the purposes of the organization in order to fully, confidently represent membership.  The need for a grassroots, proactive, and unified ATE voice has become especially pressing because teacher education has experienced an increase in its misrepresentation to the public and is being undermined as a result of national and state legislation that is not based on reliable, comprehensive research. This Position Framework is annually reviewed and updated by the Legislative and Governmental Relations Committee, the Council of Unit Presidents, the Resolutions Committee, and the ATE Board of Directors to reflect current knowledge bases, best practice, and a unified ATE voice.

The ATE Mission

Members of the Association of Teacher Educators are dedicated to the improvement of teacher education.  This fundamental mission takes place through leadership in: (1) the development of quality programs to prepare teachers, (2) the analysis of issues and practices related to the preparation and career-long professional development of teachers, and (3) the provision of opportunities for the professional and personal growth of Association members.  Each of these three components of the ATE mission are enacted through the following ATE Position Framework based on the ATE Mission Statement and the association Purposes under Article I, ATE Corporate Bylaws, February, 2002.

Position Framework: ATE

[Numbers in brackets are the year and assigned sequence number of each resolution passed.]

1)      Develop quality programs to prepare teachers

ATE affirms the need to prepare a sufficient supply of highly qualified teachers from diverse backgrounds for all children in all types of schools.  ATE supports local, state, and federal incentives for teaching in high-needs districts and supports the recruitment of a diverse teaching force reflective of the diversity in contemporary society.  School districts, however, must offer competitive salaries in order to attract highly qualified teachers.  Highly qualified teachers hold high expectations for all children and are prepared to meet the challenges of today’s diverse classrooms.  Equity in education is a top priority for ATE. Proactive teacher educators accept the challenge to:

A.      Address the need to prepare a sufficient supply of diverse, highly qualified, well-prepared teachers for all children in all states and geographic regions, and for all types of schools.

-          ATE supports the preparation of teachers who hold high expectations for children and who are prepared to meet the needs of children in diverse classrooms. [93-7]

-          ATE supports local, state, and federal incentives for teaching in high-needs districts.

-          ATE supports the recruitment of a diverse teaching force that reflects the diversity in contemporary society.

-          ATE believes school districts are responsible for securing fully qualified teachers by offering salaries which are sufficiently competitive.  [82-2]

-          ATE’s Public Relations Committee will develop programs to inform students of the benefits of teaching as a worthwhile career choice.  [85-1]

-          Equity in education is a top priority.  [85-2]

-          ATE opposes the development of alternative certification programs by private for-profit organizations unless they meet the same quality control measures and standards required for program approval at colleges and universities within their respective states. [02-2]

-          ATE recognizes and supports national initiatives that promote the role of two-year colleges in teacher education that meet the same high quality standards and expectations of accredited programs, and also encourages members and their related institutions to promote articulation and collaboration with two-year colleges. [05-1]

ATE is committed to the preparation and dissemination of ideas, innovations, and best practices that foster quality teacher preparation programs and continuing professional development, especially through strong, collaborative partnerships including college/university-district/consortium partnerships.  Proactive teacher educators accept the challenge to:

B.      Prepare and disseminate ideas, innovations, and best practices that foster quality teacher preparation programs.

-          ATE encourages closer collaboration between education faculty and liberal arts

      faculty in reviewing the quality of total teacher preparation.  [84-1]

-          ATE will prepare and disseminate at least one publication annually to be

      disseminated to the appropriate bodies and to the media.  [85-4]

-          ATE opposes state-mandated limits for the number of hours of professional

      teacher preparation.  [89-1]

-     ATE supports the development of activities and programs for the initial and ongoing

       professional preparation of educational personnel regarding the identification and elimination

       of stereotyping practices in educational settings. [07-1]

-     ATE supports multiple pathways to educator preparation program accreditation. [07-2]

-    ATE will articulate and defend best practices related to program development, educator preparation programs, and program approval. [12-1b]

  -     ATE encourages state agencies, accrediting agencies, and institutions of higher education  

         to continue the use of candidate competence and related performance assessments in the

         program approval process. [12-1a]

ATE encourages closer collaborative efforts between education faculty, liberal arts faculty, and educators in public school systems in reviewing the quality of teacher preparation programs.  Such collaborative efforts should also be used to support programs for teachers at all stages of their professional development, especially beginning teachers, to help attract and retain highly qualified teachers. ATE opposes state-mandated limits for the number of hours of professional teacher preparation.  Proactive teacher educators accept the challenge to:

C.      Establish and foster strong, college/university-district/consortium partnerships to support programs for teachers at all stages of their careers, particularly at the beginning stage, to help attract and retain high quality teachers.

-   ATE endorses collaboration between teacher education faculty, liberal arts faculty, and educators in public school systems.

ATE is committed to promoting, initiating, and engaging in quality teacher education program development and research. ATE will prepare at least one publication annually and disseminate to the appropriate bodies and to the media.  The Yearbook and Journal are good examples of appropriate vehicles for dissemination.  Proactive teacher educators accept the challenge to:

D.      Promote, initiate, and engage in quality teacher education program development and research.

ATE is a strong advocate for high quality, research-based approaches to admission, credentialing, induction, and retention processes that ensure equity and access for all prospective teachers.  ATE supports diversity in education.  This commitment to diversity originates with ATE’s understanding of the concept of pluralism and the importance of creating a teaching force representative of the broader pluralistic society.  ATE advocates affirmative action and multicultural education as programs supportive of diversity in education.  ATE’s commitment to diversity also influences its position on a number of critical issues where diversity may not be maintained.  ATE is opposed to lowering or eliminating teacher licensure requirements for emergency certification or for any other reason and supports mentoring programs to assist beginning teachers in making the transition from novice to experienced professional.  ATE supports the rights and responsibilities of underserved populations in educational institutions and settings.  Proactive teacher educators accept the challenge to:

E.       Advocate for multiple, high-quality, research-based approaches to the admission, credentialing, induction, and retention processes that ensure equity and access for all prospective teachers.

-          ATE reaffirms support of diversity in education. [92-1]

-          ATE reaffirms support of the concept of pluralism in teacher education [81-1] and recognizes the importance of creating a teaching force that is representative of the broader pluralistic society.  [87-2]

-          ATE supports affirmative action in educational settings.

-          ATE supports multi-cultural education.

-          ATE supports the rights and responsibilities of underserved persons in educational institutions and settings.

-          ATE opposes the lowering and/or abrogation of certification standards in the name of emergency certification.  [83-4]

-          Induction year programs need to be established to assist beginning teachers in making the transition from novice to experienced professional.  [87-1]

-          State organizations need to determine if legislation for liability insurance exists for candidates in their early field experiences [as well as during student teaching].  [88-4]

ATE is committed to work toward the integration of professional preparation for educators into career-long professional development involving sound theory and effective practices at all stages of the teacher career cycle.  ATE supports the work of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards as an exemplary program for achieving this goal.  Proactive teacher educators accept the challenge to:

F.       Work toward the integration of professional preparation for educators into career-long professional development involving sound theory and effective practices at all stages.

-          ATE supports the work of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards.  [91-1]

-          ATE needs to appoint a Commission on Teacher Assessment.  [85-10]

ATE is an advocate for reliable, valid, and reasonable assessment requirements for teachers and students at all levels.  While ATE supports basic skill competence and professional expertise for beginning teachers, ATE opposes the use of standardized exams as the sole or primary criterion for assessment of students at the p-12 or college level or for determining a quality school.  Proactive teacher educators accept the challenge to:

G.      Advocate for reliable, valid, and reasonable assessment requirements, instruments, and processes for pre-service and in-service teachers, as well as for p-12 students.

-          ATE opposes the use of standardized exams as the sole or primary criteria for assessment of students at the p-12 and college levels.or for determining what constitutes a quality school.  [93-9]

-          ATE believes that any effort to employ state-wide competency testing be consistent with relevant professional practices. [80-7]\

-          ATE supports the development and application of certification requirements and standards that ensure all beginning teachers demonstrate both minimal basic skill competence and minimal professional expertise. [86-3].

ATE supports strong, balanced preparation of teachers including content expertise, foundational studies, multicultural and multilingual education, and sound pedagogical practice at all levels of the professional continuum.  Pre-service graduates must also be prepared to meet the needs of individuals with disabilities through experience in a field-based setting.  ATE supports the preparation of preservice and inservice teachers and other education professionals for school, family, and community involvement, including the preparation of preservice teachers to work effectively with parents.  Proactive teacher educators accept the challenge to:

H.      Foster the strong and balanced preparation of teachers in subject matter content, foundational studies, multicultural and multilingual education, and sound pedagogical practice at all levels of the professional development continuum.

-          ATE supports the preparation of preservice and inservice teachers for school, family, and community involvement, including the preparation of pre-service teachers to work effectively with parents.  [97-2]

-          ATE supports the development and implementation of curricular experiences that prepare graduates to meet the needs of individuals with disabilities.  [95-1]

-          ATE supports the concept and practice of inclusive education, including policies, standards, and practices encouraging teacher preparation programs to include instruction designed to improve candidates’ knowledge and skills in working with students who have special needs. [10-2]

ATE is an advocate for p-12 students, believing that best practices for high quality educational experiences should be supported and fully funded. ATE advocates the incorporation of child abuse information in all preservice and inservice programs of study and supports collaboration with other education and child advocacy groups to promote the general well being of children and youth.  ATE supports full funding for educating refugee and illegal alien students, for nutritional school lunch programs, and for quality education for children with AIDS.  ATE is opposed to budget reductions to public education. ATE also supports the concept and practice of inclusive schools, including the creation of school climates supportive of all family patterns. ATE supports the concept of a safe school environment for all children and recognizes the importance of parents and other caregivers in children’s education.  Proactive teacher educators accept the challenge to:

I.         Advocate for best practices that foster high quality educational experiences for p-12 students.

-          ATE supports the concept and practice of inclusive school.  [95-1]

-          ATE supports the involvement of parents and other caregivers in their children’s education.  [93-1]

-          ATE encourages the creation of school climates that are supportive of all family patterns.  [82-11]

-          ATE supports the construction and maintenance of safe school environments.  [93-6]

-          ATE supports policies [standards] and practices encouraging teacher preparation programs to include instruction designed to improve candidates’ knowledge and skills in working with students with special needs. [80-5]

-          ATE believes the federal government should provide full funding for the costs necessary to educate refugee students. [81-5]

-          ATE supports funding teachers’ work with refugee and illegal alien students.  [82-6]

-          ATE opposes further budget reductions to public education.  [82-7]

-          ATE supports adequate funding for a nutritional school lunch program.  [82-8]

-          ATE believes that counselors are needed in all elementary schools [as well as in middle and high schools].  [86-1]

-          ATE supports the right of all children with AIDS to the continued delivery of a quality education.  [88-1]

-          ATE supports external, scholarly, impartial, and non-partisan review of the provisions and the positive, negative, and tertiary effects of No Child Left Behind prior to or in conjunction with reauthorization of the law. [08-1]

2)      Analyze issues and practices related to the preparation and professional development of teachers.

ATE supports collaborative efforts with other educational agencies, organizations, and institutions, especially among teacher education institutions, teacher organizations, school districts, and other concerned groups.  ATE supports the work of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards and supports the coordinating council between ATE and AACTE to present a united voice to policymakers. At the national level, ATE supports collaboration with other organizations to maintain licensure reciprocity procedures and to monitor significant educational legislation.  The role of the federal government in setting educational policy should include a system of checks and balances involving leaders in the teacher education and education communities.  Proactive teacher educators are challenged to:

A.    Cooperate with other educational agencies, organizations, and institutions.

-          ATE reaffirms support for collaborative efforts among teacher education institutions, teachers’ organizations, school districts, and other concerned groups.  [84-2]

-          ATE supports the work of the NBPTS and requests that the NBPTS consider concerns of ATE.  [91-1]

-          ATE supports working with other education and child advocacy groups to promote the general well being of children and youth.  [93-3]

-          ATE supports the formation of an ATE/AACTE coordinating council to work together on issues of common concern and present a united institutional voice and individual voice to policymakers where appropriate.  [95-2]

-          ATE encourages the incorporation of information on child abuse in all preservice and inservice programs of study.  [80-6]

-          Leaders in the educational community should evaluate the federal government’s

      role in teacher education.  [81-6]

-          ATE supports work with organizations to promote certification reciprocity

      procedures.  [82-1]

-          ATE needs to closely monitor significant educational legislation.   [83-2]

-          ATE supports the repeal of any federal or state legislation targeting LGBT individuals and supports the formulation of equal rights legislation.  [07-1]

Historical Background: ATE Position Framework

A joint subcommittee of the Legislative and Governmental Relations Committee and the Council of Unit Presidents, after a vote of approval for their work from the 2003 ATE Delegate Assembly, drafted an ATE Position Framework document.  The ATE Position Framework is based on the ATE Mission Statement, Purposes, and ATE Corporate BylawsThe basis for association positions are the resolutions that have come through the resolutions committee over the past two decades and continue to evolve. 

The framework was circulated among members of both committees via e-mail, revised in a working joint meeting of both committees, presented to the ATE Board of Directors, and reviewed/revised during an open hearing for all ATE members during the 2003 summer conference.  The reviewed/ revised framework was circulated to all members of both committees prior to the February 2004 meeting in Dallas, via President Van Tassell to the ATE Board, and to CUP members who were encouraged to elicit feedback and revisions within their state or regional units prior to the Dallas meeting.  The committees met jointly again in Dallas, and brought the position framework forward to the 2004 Delegate Assembly as promised in the 2003 Delegate Assembly.

The initial ATE Policy Framework was passed by the Delegate Assembly in February, 2004. The ATE President and Executive Director were thereby authorized and empowered to represent the tenets of the Position Framework to internal and external constituencies. 

This Position Framework is annually reviewed and updated by the Council of Unit Presidents, the Legislative and Governmental Relations Committee, and the ATE Board of Directors to reflect current knowledge bases, best practice, and a unified ATE voice. 

The document reflects on-going work, beginning in February 2003, by members of the ATE:

·         Council of Unit Presidents

-          Pennie Olson (IL), Chair: 2003-2005

-          Annette Digby (NY), Chair: 2005-2007

-          Kathy Brown (SC) Chair: 2007-2009

-          Sandy Alber (MI) Chair: 2009-2011

-          George Fero (IL) Chair: 2011-2013

-          Mary Selke (NC), Executive Secretary: 2003-

·         Legislative and Governmental Relations Committee

-          Jim Alouf  (VA), Chair: 2003-2006

-          Terry Blue (PA), Chair: 2006-2009

-          Denise Staudt (TX), Chair:

·         Resolutions Committee

-          Charlotte Reed (IN), Chair: 2003-2006

-          Joseph Barnes (PA), Chair: 2006-

-          Charlotte Mendoza (CO), Chair:

 

 

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